For category: Academic Research

The Heart of the Matter

Love may be in the air on Valentine’s Day, but just how you feel about the holiday can depend on your age and whether you’re in a relationship.

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AARP Foundation survey shows that many people associate the holidays with warm feelings of love and joy. But for others, it can be a lonely, difficult time.

A new study—the first to examine whether social isolation also affects health care spending among older adults—finds that a lack of social contacts among older adults is associated with an estimated $6.7 billion in additional Medicare spending annually.

On June 15, the United Nations observes the less publicized World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, focusing attention on the hidden tragedy of abuse, neglect and exploitation of elderly people throughout the world.

It’s widely believed that older age is darkened by persistent loneliness. But a considerable body of research confirms this isn’t the case.

Social isolation is a bigger problem than you may know. Fixing broken connections can help people thrive. Here are some ways we can work together to end social isolation.

The Global Council on Brain Health (GCBH) is an independent collaborative of scientists, health professionals, scholars, and policy experts from around the world working in areas of brain health related to human cognition. Download their report: Recommendations on Social Engagement and Brain Health

Loneliness has been associated with increased mortality and a range of adverse health outcomes that are both prevalent and costly in older age. Loneliness, however, is often a hidden problem. It has few clear outward indicators, some degree of stigma attached, and no proven solutions beyond conventional wisdom about trying to make friends and find meaningful pursuits and activities.